Basketball Tips – Hook Shot

Since the advent of the jump shot fewer players are spending more time on developing the hook shot. But the hook shot is still and effective shot when taken close to the basket. Whilst it is usually a favourite weapon of the taller players all players should work on the skill so they can take full advantage of opportunities which otherwise might be wasted. A smaller player will often succeed with a hook shot, whereas a jump shot is more easily blocked by a taller opponent.

Perhaps the most famous exponent of the hook shot was Kareem Abdul Jabbar who, at over 217cm tall dominated the sport through his long career playing with the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA after winning three NCAA championships with UCLA. Kareem exploited the NBA rule that prohibited the use of zone defenses and in one on one situations became almost unstoppable using what commonly became known as “the sky hook” No player has taken over the mantel of hook shot specialist since Kareem retired although there are many players at all levels of the sport still using the hook shot effectively.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Action Portrait

In cases where a team is lucky enough to have a tall player who is being covered by a smaller opponent, it is a worthwhile tactic to set up the tall player close to the basket and let him work on his hook shot. If he is able to convert a high percentage, which he should if defended one on one, then you have a valuable asset. However it is more likely that the opposing team will call for defensive help against the tall player using double teaming tactics. This should open up opportunities for passes to team-mates and uncontested perimeter shots.

When making the hook shot the object is to receive the ball as close as possible to the basket and then keep the body between the ball and the defender. If the shot is taken with the right hand the shooter jumps off his left foot and keeps the ball close to the body with his elbow bent as he is jumping. The balance hand is used to protect the ball but will be released from the ball before it gets to about head height. Although the shot is normally commenced with the player’s back to the basket you should be facing the ring at the completion of the shot and upon landing be ready to follow the shot for a possible rebound. The hook shot may also be used following an offensive rebound. After recovering the ball from a rebound the player makes a strong cross-over step turning his back to the defender and then pivoting toward the basket while protecting the ball for the hook shot.

Source: betterbasketball.com.au

profile-pic2

Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Advertisements

Basketball Tips – Set Shot

The first step in developing good shooting technique is to stand close to the basket about one metre from the back-board just slightly to one side of the ring. Set the ball in front of the face about level with the chin. For this basic shot the ball should rest in your right hand if you are right hand shooter and left hand if you are a left handed shooter.

rayallen_jumpshot

 

The other and is used merely to balance the ball and is placed at the side of the ball. The wrist of the shooting hand is flexed so the back of the hand is at a right angle to the forearm which should be in a vertical position, thus leaving the ball directly above the elbow. The knees should be slightly flexed with the right foot slightly in front of the other. The slight turn of the body will allow you to move the forearm, elbow and wrist in the same vertical plane and will help you keep your elbow close to your body.

Once you are in the set position the only movement prior to commencing the shot will be the knees bending slightly to establish a rhythm for the shot. The ball remains still and as the knees are straightened the elbow is raised with the wrist remaining flexed until the arm is fully extended toward the ring. At the top of the extension of the arm the wrist is snapped as the hand moves from its right angle position to the forearm to pointing downwards looking like what we call a “goose’s neck”. The ball should bounce softly off the backboard and fall to the bottom of the net. The “target” for the shooter in this position would normally be just inside the top right hand corner of the rectangle painted above the ring.

Source: betterbasketball.com.au

profile-pic2

Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Shooting Tips

Shooting can be just awesome…

However if you’re doing this in real time here’s some handy tips

Since a team must score to win, shooting is undoubtedly an important fundamental of the game. If there is a secret to good shooting it is countless hours of practice and more practice. Why do coaches love to see a goal on the side of the garage or on a pole in the back yard? It is because such goals give opportunities for more hours and hours of practice. Probably more shooters have been made in the back yard than anywhere else.

maxresdefault-1

The old expression of “practice makes perfect” is not entirely correct. What is a more appropriate expression is “perfect practice makes perfect” The most important point is to practise using correct technique. Once sound technique has been established, practise within comfortable range of the basket and then gradually increase the distance. Many players make the mistake of practising long range shots before being able to make a high percentage of shots close to the basket. Straining to make the range will lead to poor technique and little progress.

When I was young, I had to learn the fundamentals of basketball. You can have all the physical ability in the world, but you still have to know the fundamentals.
Michael Jordan

Coaches may find it relatively easy to teach technique, but it is much more difficult to teach “touch”. Try to make the shot “soft” no matter what the range. You should develop the feeling that you are placing the ball into the ring and not just shooting at it. I often suggest that the player tries to imagine the ring is covered with a thin sheet of glass and he should place the ball on the thin sheet of glass without breaking it.

Coaches can instruct on technique but it is difficult to teach touch. One thing in common between great shoot is that each shot looks the same no matter how far out it might be. This comes from using good technique, but it also shows the players have good touch. When a player with good touch shoots the ball it will go through the net with a smooth swish whether it was a layup or long range jump shot.

There is a different preparation leading up to each shot but the final release of the ball, with the wrist snapping and the index and second finger last to leave the ball, is the same. Take care how it feels as you release the ball so that you can develop the fine accuracy which is necessary for success.

maxresdefault.jpg

Another point of emphasis is where and the player should determine his shooting target. Players often hesitate when asked about their aim when they are shooting. This suggests they have not made a habit of creating a precise target when shooting. Some may aim at the front of the rim with the intention of shooting just over it while others might aim for the back of the rim. I don’t agree with either of these responses but say, “If you aim at a particular target you may hit it” I prefer to aim at the centre of the ring. Unfortunately may players aim in the general direction of the ring without being precise about the target so high percentage and consistent shooting will be rare.

The basic shots in basketball are the lay-up, the set shot, the jump shot and the hook shot. There are others of course, including the dunk shot, the alley-oop shot, the jump hook shot and reverse layup, but now we are only going to concentrate on the basic shots.

Source: betterbasketball.com.au

profile-pic2

Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.