Nellakir works with Schools in maintaining High Grade Sprung Timber Sports Flooring

We reprint here in full an article from School News, a national magazine distributed to all primary and secondary schools Australia wide. it features an interview with Nellakir Managing Director Rick Allen on both the Construction of Sprung Timber Sports Flooring for indoor school stadiums as well as some useful tips on the ongoing maintenance of Timber Sports Flooring to ensure its optimum performance for years to come.

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Sprung Timber Sports Floors for Sustained Performance

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State Netball and Hockey Centre with Sprung Timber Sports Flooring by Nellakir

In term four it’s time to regenerate sports fields and empty your school pool for cleaning (if you have one). This is the period for any large scale maintenance to occur, while the clatter of not so tiny feet is heard elsewhere, and the school is quiet.

Multi-purpose sports halls take some punishing traffic throughout the school year and require constant attention. The life expectancy of sports surfaces ranges from 15 to more than 50 years, with various options available to suit a multiplicity of sports. Each substance requires a material-specific maintenance and replacement regime – and all will underperform if this is not adequately managed.

Sharing the mantle with Christmas and New Year, summer holidays in Australia can be a difficult time to get things done; thinking ahead is imperative. School News consulted Rick Allen from Nellakir, for the lowdown on a maintenance schedule for existing sprung timber floors, and what’s involved with installing new timber flooring for your sporting facility.

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Industry View

Mr Allen says indoor sprung timber flooring is gaining popularity, and that government subsidies have mitigated the drain on the budget, making it well worth a look. “In Victoria, for example, the Private Partnership Project (PPP) has facilitated the construction of new sprung timber sports floors at government schools across regional and Metropolitan Melbourne.”

He says the Victorian government has undertaken to co-fund facilities at primary schools that will be available to local sporting competitions outside school hours. “The rationale behind the PPP is to fully embed the school in local community and neighbourhood life.”

“Nellakir has constructed sprung timber floors for eight of these new PPP sports facilities since the PPP began in 2016, and the the courts are used by the schools as well as for the broader local community.”

“Sprung timber sports floors are shaping up as the top pick for government initiatives, and the trend is extending to other states,” he said. “The Victorian government has commissioned the construction of the state’s first ‘vertical’ school in Ferrars St, South Melbourne. Nellakir is providing a multipurpose, sprung timber sports floor for the school – with a full size indoor court suitable for basketball, netball, volleyball, gymnastics, and for school assemblies.”

Mr Allen says the reason for the shift towards sprung timber is its high level of resilience, durability and sustained performance. “Its long life expectancy is an attractive prospect, especially when dealing with a provider that can offer schools a life-time maintenance service.”

“While installing sprung timber flooring ensures students are playing on surfaces primed for premium sports competition, these school gyms do draw a crowd. With local basketball, netball and volleyball competitions using the facilities, they sustain heavy traffic, which makes for real wear and tear.”

“Timber is a ‘living’ material,” he continued. “It requires regular treatment, to ensure it maintains bounce and surface regularity.”

“The surface of the court has a specialist coating of oil modified urethane that enables the glide, the speed, and reliability players depend upon in all levels of competition. On busy court surfaces, re-application should occur annually.” Mr Allen says superficial maintenance requirements should be minimal: “Line markings should only be required at re-sand, except in cases where regular maintenance has not occurred.”

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Maintenance Schedule

Sprung timber floors require a simple re-coating every 12 months to maintain the high level of surface quality and slip resistance – while a complete re-sanding should occur every seven to 12 years. The annual re-coating replenishes the floor, according to Mr Allen, though regular examination of the surface is advised. “Sport finishes are designed for grip, and the time it takes to wear will also depend on the extent and frequency of use.”

“Re-coating maintains the grip required from the floor for elite sports action, maintains essential safety features especially important for schools – and lastly, it maintains the aesthetic appeal.”

“With wear and tear and the build-up of finishes (coatings), re-sanding brings sports flooring back to the original brand-new state,” he explained.

The process involves a total sanding back of the floor. The surface then requires reapplication of the finish and protective coatings that give sprung timber sports floors that sleek, polished appearance.

Long-range upkeep, will eventually involve removal and replacement. “After a specified period of time, which will depend on usage, upkeep, and wear and tear, sports flooring will need replacing,” Mr Allen advised.

In the ‘cosmetic repair’ category, line markings may need to be refreshed. A variation in line markings may also be required, when new sports are embraced by the school community.

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Stadium seating

Specific seating designed to sit safely atop the gloss finish of the sprung timber flooring is also recommended. To guard against slip-related accidents, as well as damage to the flooring from abrasive materials, seating can be sourced from timber floor providers.

“Regular safety assessments of flooring and seating should be conducted by your provider,” Mr Allen noted. “From a public liability perspective, this process is highly recommended.”

Receiving monitoring and maintenance on both flooring and seating from the original installer means “all repairs to stadium seating are based on original specifications, ensuring required integrity and functionality”. Mr Allen says sprung timber sports floors have gained the confidence of schools; sporting clubs and associations, and governments, due to their versatility, long product life, and aesthetic appeal. He said, “if an experienced supplier with a comprehensive service package is involved, the installation takes the skinned knees out of netball and the headaches out of maintenance for years to come”.

Source: School News

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

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Basketball skills for all – Dribbling

Dribbling is the first basketball skilled a player will learn. It is a great weapon for the offensive player when executed properly however it can also be misused and over-used. If you are being closely guarded the dribble may be used to create space for a pass to a team-mate or a drive to the basket. When teaching our junior players I often repeat the instruction “drive to score – not to explore.”

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This is a simple way to emphasize to the players that it is unwise to dribble the ball without good intentions. There are too many times when a player dribbles the ball around and through the defenders trying to find a pathway to the basket and almost inevitably gets into difficulty and loses possession or breaks down the team offense.

Dribbling, like other fundamental skills, must be practiced until it becomes a natural movement. A good player seems to control the ball so well that it becomes almost a part of his body, enabling him to move anywhere on the court with complete confidence.

More players these days are developing incredible skills dribbling the ball behind their back, or between their legs using cross-over dribbling and reverses. Good dribbling is no longer the exclusive domain of the smaller players. Every player on the team is expected to be able to control the ball under extreme defensive pressure, keeping their head up and able to make a pass to a team-mate or strong drive to the basket.

A low, or control dribble is used whenever a player is in a congested area. The ball should be pushed to the floor and not batted. Cup the dribbling hand slightly. The fingers and wrist should be doing most of the work. The hand goes down with the ball as it is pushed to the floor and comes up with the ball as it rebounds from the floor. The offside arm should be raised and held steady to resist pressure applied by the defender. Do not extend the protecting arm as this may cause contact which could be called a foul. The body should always be between the ball and the defender. During the low dribble the ball should not bounce higher than between the knee and the waist level.

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In a cross-over dribble the dribbling hand pushes the ball down and up to the opposite hand as the foot on the side of the dribbling hand comes forward. This enables a change of direction and protection of the ball from the defender. The cross-over dribble should only be used when there is sufficient space between the dribbler and the defender, otherwise a behind the back dribble may be used.

To help learn the behind the back dribble use a zig-zag drive down the court changing direction each time you change the dribbling had. Push the ball behind the back as the leg opposite to the dribbling hand comes forward. This keeps the opposite foot and leg out of the way as the ball hits the floor. As you change direction on the next half step your body will protect the ball until you make the next behind-the-back dribble.

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When advancing the ball down the court without defensive pressure use the high, or speed dribble. Push the ball further way from the body to enable a quicker drive. Sometimes several steps may be taken between each dribble as the ball is pushed well out in front of the body. Players at the higher levels may use as few as two bounces to take the ball from the centre-line to the basket while running at top speed. However at the younger age levels it is more important to maintain control of the ball and your body while learning how to use the speed dribble.

When practicing alone, always try to practice at game speed. Sometimes players may be able to dribble quite well when alone and moving slowly, but once the game has started and defensive pressure is applied they may lose their technique and control.

Source: betterbasketball.com.au

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Defending great scorers

Regardless at whatever level basketball is played it always seems as though there is someone on the opposing team who is their prime “go to” player, the leading scorer, the “clutch” performer. Players and coaches spend endless time searching for the way in which they might subdue the opposition star and thus pave the way for victory.

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One of the problems for the tacticians is the fact that quite often the talents of the star scorer and the team methods will vary significantly.

Eddie Palubinskas, one of Australia’s greatest ever scorers usually needed little help from his team-mates and could score equally effectively from close, or long range from the basket. Ian Davies was equally independent, but did most of his scoring from long range. Andrew Gaze has been the most prolific but, although he has great skill in creating his own scoring opportunities, depends more on team structure when racking up big numbers. Oscar Schmidt, the highest scorer ever in Olympic Games, also needed little help from his Brazilian team-mates and when the defence got tougher he just moved further away from the basket.

Perhaps, surprisingly, Australia had one of the best records of success over Brazil during the Oscar Schmidt era. This was mainly due to the emphasis that Australia placed on defending Schmidt. The theory being, if Schmidt is contained then there would not be enough score power from the rest of the team. No doubt other teams had similar intentions, but failed more often because of the spread of talent in the Brazilian line-up and the “conventional” way in which they would defend Schmidt. Oscar would just play further from the basket, receive the ball and blaze away from incredible range and still connect on a high percentage. Meanwhile his team-mates would reap the benefit of extra attention on Oscar and Brazil would be one of the highest scoring teams in international competition.

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The Boomers solution to the problem of dealing with a great shooter was to oppose him with a player committed to the task and prepared to use unconventional methods. Mel Dalgleish and Larry Sengstock each had their own way of dealing with the problem. Mel was more physical and Larry was more “cerebral”, but both had a mission to prevent the great scorer from receiving the ball no matter where he was on the court. Other players on the Boomers squad, understanding the prime objective, concentrated on pressuring the ball handlers making any potential pass to Oscar very difficult. Quite often the offence broke down into a series of one on one plays with lower percentage shots, which, on most occasions, worked to the advantage of the Boomers.

The strategy of “starving” great shooters of the ball becomes more difficult when team structure is geared to help the shooter get free and team defence, as compared to individual defence, is vital. The Melbourne Tigers “Shuffle” offence is a typical example. The offence is designed to set up certain players in certain situations and unless the defence does something special players will get free in their preferred positions and it just becomes a matter of whether they can convert the opportunities. Andrew Gaze has been the main force for the Tigers for many years and has experienced just about every different tactic imaginable, but has still managed to average over 30 points per game.

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LOS ANGELES, UNITED STATES: Michael Jordan of the Chicago Bulls (L) eyes the basket as he is guarded by Kobe Bryant of the Los Angeles Lakers during their 01 February game in Los Angeles, CA. Jordan will appear in his 12th NBA All-Star game 08 February while Bryant will make his first All-Star appearance. The Lakers won the game 112-87. AFP PHOTO/Vince BUCCI (Photo credit should read Vince Bucci/AFP/Getty Images)

Sometimes defenders choose to “concede” the points of a high scorer and concentrate harder on shutting down the others. An extra effort on players who may usually be the second leading scorer can prove successful. This usually means drawing the extra defensive help from another player who can be an acceptable risk. These tactics work best when teams have rigidly structured and predictable offences, thus allowing well prepared team defences to over play certain elements. The high scorer may still get his “quota” but without a balanced contribution from the others the team will fail.

When describing how to defend great scorers, John Wooden (UCLA) said, “High scorers usually like to get a good start in the game and if they don’t their anxiety can increase and lead to errors. Therefore it is often a good tactic to impose more pressure in the early stages of a game on the “shooter” and see if he has the patience to work through the pressure.” The great Larry Bird, while playing with Boston, was quite often subjected to this kind of pressure and in these circumstances would describe himself as a “decoy”.
It didn’t bother him to be subjected to extra pressure as he would welcome the attention and create more opportunities for his team-mates. His coach also acknowledged that you have to be a very good player to be a good decoy.

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Throughout history there have been very few great shooters who could be described as “complete”, i.e. equally effective close the basket or on the perimeter, able to put the ball to the floor on hard drives, or receive on the perimeter and go straight up for the long range jumpers. Oscar Robertson, Michael Jordan, Larry Bird and “Magic” Johnson are a few who could be mentioned. It was rare for them to be contained, no matter what tactics the defenders might use, they would still get their points and still be match winners.

There are others who have built reputations for being among the best, like Kareem Jabbar, Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell, Rick Barry, Shaquille O’Neil. All were, or are great scorers, but by comparison could almost be described as one dimensional. Kareem had his “sky hook” and during a time when the rules prevented zone defences, his hook shot became virtually indefensible. If the dunk had been barred Wilt Chamberlain would have struggled to earn half the number of points. Similarly “Shaq” has trouble scoring from anything except point blank range.

The mission for defending great scorers like those just mentioned is to force them to do something other than there preferred high percentage play. Of course achieving this is usually much easier said than done. Denying Kareem, or Shaq the ball close to the basket requires huge physical presence and team pressure on the passers. Denying Rick Barry his smooth perimeter jump shot required a similar team effort to that which was necessary for Oscar Schmidt. Teams in our NBL have been trying to stop Ricky Grace from driving left ever since he arrived in Australia a decade ago, but few have succeeded. Ricky goes to his right just enough to keep his opponent honest and unless there is a team defence approach the high scoring guard continues not only to score well himself but create high percentage opportunities for team mates.

The task of the defence to restrict great shooters has always, and probably will remain, very difficult. Players must recognise the special ways in which great shooters create their opportunities and then try to force them to their least preferred options. For players who have the benefit of well structured offences to help them get open the task for the defence is even greater. It requires determined individual pressure and skill and more importantly a coordinated team effort.

Source: betterbasketball.com.au

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Nellakir – The Professional Choice for Sports Floor Maintenance and Construction

For Nellakir this is a busy time of the year. It’s School Holidays! So on top of our busy construction schedule, this is the time we carry out mandatory cyclical maintenance on Sprung Timber Sports Flooring in Schools and Community Venues. Recoating, linemarking and ensuring that your competition court has the requisite bounce and traction.

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Right now Nellakir are doing recoats on 26 courts at different locations. included are the following…MBC_Nellakir_Knox_02a for brochure

  • Camberwell Girls Grammar
  • Casterton Secondary School
  • William Ruthuen College
  • Brentwood Secondary College
  • Barwon Heads Primary School
  • St Francis Xavier College
  • Kismet Park Primary School
  • Highton Christian College
  • Mount Ridley P12 College
  • Yarraville West Primary School
  • Urban Camp (also repairs)
  • St Josephs College
  • Lalor East Primary School
  • Torquay College
  • Wellington Secondary College
  • Christian College Geelong
  • Northern Bay P12 College
  • Federation University Australia (also repairs)
  • Wesley College Melbourne – Glen Waverly Campus
  • Wesley College Melbourne – St Kilda Rd Campus
  • Mansfield Sporting Complex
  • Ballarat and Clarendon College (linemarking)
  • Werribee West Family Centre (resanding)
  • Errol St North Melbourne (repair)

When you contract Nellakir, you’re ensuring a professional finish, backed by real experience and understanding. For Nellakir a sprung timber floor is a living thing, an asset that must be maintained and cared for from the day it is constructed. And being the leading constructor and builder of elite sprung timber sports flooring in Victoria and Tasmania for Basketball, Netball, Volleyball and other ancillary competition courts, Nellakir know and understand what is required to keep your court or flooring in premium condition.

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Nellakir can provide effective and professional repairs to all timber sports flooring. A full maintenance program is provided to the management teams of all courts constructed by Nellakir. Or if you would like to take advantage of the Nellakir professional program, don’t hesitate to call on 03 9467 6126 for a proposed plan and a free no obligation quote.

Many of the timber sports flooring courts being built by the State Government in both new and existing schools double as Community assets in the evenings and on weekends.

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Nellakir are now taking bookings for the Christmas break, scheduling Recoatings, Sandings, Annual Linemarking, removal and refittings, repairs or total resurfacing. Book now either by calling 03 9467 6126 or by leaving your contact details and request here [LINK] and we will contact you to arrange a site visit and/or Quotation.

Move up to a totally professional approach to your Competition Sprung Timber Sports Flooring. Engage Nellakir and experience the best.

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At Nellakir we create Sports Flooring for Champions. With leading edge technology from Australian Sports Floors Horner Pty Ltd, Nellakir have constructed courts at the State Basketball Centre Knox, The State Netball and Hockey Centre, Royal Park and many other well known premium competition locations.

Go with Nellakir – and you’re on a winner. For all Sprung Timber Flooring state wide – Victoria and Tasmania. Go with the professionals.

 

Nellakir – Setting the Standard in Sprung Timber Flooring

At Nellakir, the team are becoming increasingly busy with new projects. The Victorian State Government has funded a number of new Multipurpose Sports Courts in both new and existing schools as well as areas designated for Performing Arts, Assembly and multi-purpose usage. The flooring selected is sprung timber and sprung timber sports flooring, with Nellakir selected to construct and provide finishing on these specialist floorings.

The Beaumaris Secondary College is a new school in a well established area. It is a project currently funded to $26.8 million. Construction commenced in early 2017. The school will provide state of the art facilities for 650 year 7 to 12 students.

“The project will revitalise a rundown site to create facilities and an outdoor environment that can be enjoyed by everyone for generations to come.”

It will provide community facilities to be utilised by the broader community for both sporting and other pursuits. Listed among the facilities to be provided is an ‘Indoor Competitive Grade Netball/Basketball Court’. Nellakir have been selected to construct this court, ready for school commencement in Term 1, 2018. The Court will also be used for performing arts and gym activities. Work by Nellakir will commence at the end of September.

Phoenix P12 Community College in Ballarat is another Government School receiving an upgrade in facilities. A multi purpose area, for gym activities and a theatre for performing arts featuring a full stage will be constructed this year with the sprung timber flooring from Nellakir a major component.

Whitefriars College is an independent College for Boys located in Donvale in metropolitan Melbourne. Nellakir are providing sprung timber flooring for a Lecture Area and function space which doubles as a circulation classroom. Work will commence later in the year in December.

Viewbank College is another Victorian School currently undergoing a modernisation program sponsored by the Victorian School Building Authority. Part of this project involves the construction of a two storey performing arts centre incorporating a theatre as well as music and drama teaching facilities. Nellakir have been contracted to provide the flooring in the uniquely designed special purpose areas as part of this exciting project.

In Braybrook, at the Caroline Chisolm Catholic College, the new Madeline Centre for the Performing Arts is under construction. Nellakir have been selected to construct sprung timber flooring for the new facility.

And finally, the team will also be engaging in the demolition and renewal of the Sports Flooring at the Rowville Community Centre in the near future. A similar task is to be undertaken at Geelong East Primary School where a water damaged floor will be demolished and re-installed as soon as possible.

For the very best in Sprung Timber Flooring, whether Sports Flooring or for Performance Art, or simply for everyday educational purposes, Nellakir are the professional choice and as shown, the first choice by quality builders and architects alike. For your next project call Nellakir on (03) 9467 6126 to ensure you engage the best. Or contact us here through our website for a prompt response.

Nellakir – for Expert Construction and Programmed Maintenance of all Sports Flooring.

The Jump Shot

When a player is a strong driver and can advance the ball quickly up the court defenders will tend to retreat away from the driver to prevent him from going all the way to the basket for an easy lay-up. The counter move for the offensive player is the jump shot. In recent years the jump shot has become the most potent weapon for the offense. Players have extended their effective range to well beyond the three point line making it even more difficult for the defense to counter the offensive strategies.

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When learning the jump shot remember to practice within comfortable range of the basket. And then gradually increase the range only after high percentage accuracy is achieved from the shorter distance. Once again it is very important that the correct footwork is used. It makes no difference if you are a left handed shooter or right handed the player must stop on the foot opposite to the dribbling hand. It is desirable to commence this shooting drill standing close to the basket as demonstrated for the set shot, but this time the pivot foot stays on the floor while the other steps into it to gather momentum for a jump. The player carries the ball up to the crown line of the head as he is jumping and then at the height of the jump releases the ball with one hand for the shot. The drill is repeated from both sides of the basket using the foot closest to the centre of the court as the pivot foot.

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After the player is able to make a high percentage of shots from close to the basket the drill is repeated from close to the free throw line except this time the player starts with a dribble. Regardless whether the player is right handed or left handed the footwork will be the same. Start close to the edge of the free throw line facing the basket with feet about shoulder width apart. The object is to take just one dribbler as the right foot hits the floor the ball hits the floor. Take possession of the ball as the left foot hits the floor then bring the right foot back to about shoulder width apart coming to a quick stop. The player should remain in a crouched position with the knees well bent and the back almost straight up. The eyes should be focused on the “target” all through the routine and after coming to a quick stop jump vertically releasing the ball with one hand at the height of the jump. In the same way as practiced close to the basket, the ball is raised to about the crown line of the head quickly during the jump. When making the dribble the player should be moving laterally to get used to squaring off to the basket with shoulders virtually parallel to the baseline at the point of release. Do not try to jump too high as this might unbalance the shot and when trying to jump too high the player is likely to raise the ball too high above his head and therefore reduce his effective shooting range.

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The drill is repeated from the other side of the keyway starting the dribble with the ball hitting the floor at the same time as the left foot hits the floor and this time stopping on the right foot for the quick jump shot. When the player is able to execute the shot after taking one dribble in either direction and stopping on the correct foot, it is then time to use more than one dribble. The emphasis is on always stopping on the inside foot, that is the foot closest to the center of the court, coming to a quick stop after squaring off to the basket, making a comfortable but aggressive vertical jump and releasing the ball with one hand at the height of the jump. Common mistakes are releasing the ball after the player has reached the height of his jump, leaving the non shooting hand on the ball for too long thus making the shot almost a two handed shot, releasing the ball too early and shooting off the wrong foot. The work spent on a young player getting the technique right in the early stages will pay good dividends for the rest of his basketball career.

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

The Layup

More in our series on improving your game. We continue with Shooting and concentrate on  “The Layup”

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The lay-up shot is the easiest shot in the game to take and yet many players tend to make it more difficult than it should be. Beginning players will improve quickly if in the initial stages care is taken using correct footwork and shooting technique. The object of the lay-up shot is to get as close to the basket as possible before releasing the ball and then laying the ball softly off the backboard. The footwork and timing for the jump is important while the release of the ball is the same as explained for the set shot.

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Start at a point about 1m. outside the edge of the free throw line facing the basket with both feet about shoulder width apart. The object of the drill is to ensure the shot is taken using the correct footwork and timing.. The player should make just one bounce (dribble) of the ball while taking only three steps. As the player takes the first step with his left foot he bounces the ball so that the ball hits the floor at the same time as the left foot hits the floor. The player takes possession of the ball as the right foot hits the floor then jumps off the left foot to take the shot. The description is for a right handed shooter and the instructions are reversed for a left handed shooter. The main point of emphasis is the right handed shooter should jump of the left foot and a left handed shooter should jump off the right foot.

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Usually it helps if the young player is instructed to call out “left, right, left” as he works at the drill and exaggerates the way he “bangs” his feet into the floor while making his three steps. For some players it may seem a little embarrassing to exaggerate the steps and to call out the steps, but it helps the rapid learning process and it can be a bit of fun as well. The drill is repeated from both sides of the keyway, then after players are able to use the correct footwork the starting point can be beyond the three point line and more than one dribble is used. The emphasis remains that the players must shoot off the correct foot.

Source: betterbasketball.com.au

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.