The Jump Shot

When a player is a strong driver and can advance the ball quickly up the court defenders will tend to retreat away from the driver to prevent him from going all the way to the basket for an easy lay-up. The counter move for the offensive player is the jump shot. In recent years the jump shot has become the most potent weapon for the offense. Players have extended their effective range to well beyond the three point line making it even more difficult for the defense to counter the offensive strategies.

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When learning the jump shot remember to practice within comfortable range of the basket. And then gradually increase the range only after high percentage accuracy is achieved from the shorter distance. Once again it is very important that the correct footwork is used. It makes no difference if you are a left handed shooter or right handed the player must stop on the foot opposite to the dribbling hand. It is desirable to commence this shooting drill standing close to the basket as demonstrated for the set shot, but this time the pivot foot stays on the floor while the other steps into it to gather momentum for a jump. The player carries the ball up to the crown line of the head as he is jumping and then at the height of the jump releases the ball with one hand for the shot. The drill is repeated from both sides of the basket using the foot closest to the centre of the court as the pivot foot.

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After the player is able to make a high percentage of shots from close to the basket the drill is repeated from close to the free throw line except this time the player starts with a dribble. Regardless whether the player is right handed or left handed the footwork will be the same. Start close to the edge of the free throw line facing the basket with feet about shoulder width apart. The object is to take just one dribbler as the right foot hits the floor the ball hits the floor. Take possession of the ball as the left foot hits the floor then bring the right foot back to about shoulder width apart coming to a quick stop. The player should remain in a crouched position with the knees well bent and the back almost straight up. The eyes should be focused on the “target” all through the routine and after coming to a quick stop jump vertically releasing the ball with one hand at the height of the jump. In the same way as practiced close to the basket, the ball is raised to about the crown line of the head quickly during the jump. When making the dribble the player should be moving laterally to get used to squaring off to the basket with shoulders virtually parallel to the baseline at the point of release. Do not try to jump too high as this might unbalance the shot and when trying to jump too high the player is likely to raise the ball too high above his head and therefore reduce his effective shooting range.

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The drill is repeated from the other side of the keyway starting the dribble with the ball hitting the floor at the same time as the left foot hits the floor and this time stopping on the right foot for the quick jump shot. When the player is able to execute the shot after taking one dribble in either direction and stopping on the correct foot, it is then time to use more than one dribble. The emphasis is on always stopping on the inside foot, that is the foot closest to the center of the court, coming to a quick stop after squaring off to the basket, making a comfortable but aggressive vertical jump and releasing the ball with one hand at the height of the jump. Common mistakes are releasing the ball after the player has reached the height of his jump, leaving the non shooting hand on the ball for too long thus making the shot almost a two handed shot, releasing the ball too early and shooting off the wrong foot. The work spent on a young player getting the technique right in the early stages will pay good dividends for the rest of his basketball career.

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

The Layup

More in our series on improving your game. We continue with Shooting and concentrate on  “The Layup”

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The lay-up shot is the easiest shot in the game to take and yet many players tend to make it more difficult than it should be. Beginning players will improve quickly if in the initial stages care is taken using correct footwork and shooting technique. The object of the lay-up shot is to get as close to the basket as possible before releasing the ball and then laying the ball softly off the backboard. The footwork and timing for the jump is important while the release of the ball is the same as explained for the set shot.

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Start at a point about 1m. outside the edge of the free throw line facing the basket with both feet about shoulder width apart. The object of the drill is to ensure the shot is taken using the correct footwork and timing.. The player should make just one bounce (dribble) of the ball while taking only three steps. As the player takes the first step with his left foot he bounces the ball so that the ball hits the floor at the same time as the left foot hits the floor. The player takes possession of the ball as the right foot hits the floor then jumps off the left foot to take the shot. The description is for a right handed shooter and the instructions are reversed for a left handed shooter. The main point of emphasis is the right handed shooter should jump of the left foot and a left handed shooter should jump off the right foot.

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Usually it helps if the young player is instructed to call out “left, right, left” as he works at the drill and exaggerates the way he “bangs” his feet into the floor while making his three steps. For some players it may seem a little embarrassing to exaggerate the steps and to call out the steps, but it helps the rapid learning process and it can be a bit of fun as well. The drill is repeated from both sides of the keyway, then after players are able to use the correct footwork the starting point can be beyond the three point line and more than one dribble is used. The emphasis remains that the players must shoot off the correct foot.

Source: betterbasketball.com.au

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Victoria’s First Vertical School, with Nellakir Sports Floors

The Victorian State Government has commissioned the construction of the state’s first ‘Vertical’ school in Ferrars St, South Melbourne. Construction is now well and truly underway; Enrolments are now being accepted and the project will be completed for the beginning of the 2018 school year.

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The school will be 5 storeys high and cater to 525 students. As part of what will be known as the Montague Precinct of the Fisherman’s Bend Urban Renewal Project, the project has been designed by Hayball architects with Tract Consultants preparing the landscape architectural elements of the school and its environs.

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Extra land adjacent to the project has been purchased by the State Government to create a vibrant open space with outdoor netball courts.

Nellakir are providing a multipurpose, sprung timber sports floor for the school with a full size indoor court suitable for Basketball, Netball, Volleyball, Gymnastics and for school assemblies. As with many new primary schools, facilities will be available to local sporting competitions on weekends and evenings. The idea is to fully embed the school in local community and neighbourhood life.

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The acquisition of land by the Port Phillip Council adjacent to the school for public use is a significant part of future planning. Council is focussed on maintaining ‘liveability’ within the high density environment evolving in this precinct. It is doing so by encouraging physical and social activity – in a safe, attractive streetscape and a park. Again this is a further extension of the PPP (Public Private Partnership) projects being undertaken by the State Government. Currently Nellakir is providing Sprung Timber Sports Flooring for a number of schools in this project, including multi use full courts, half courts and gymnasium floors and surfaces.

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It is estimated that over 80,000 people will live in the 455 hectare Fisherman’s Bend area by 2050, and the overall project (of which this is an integral part) is often referred to as Australia’s largest Urban Renewal Project.

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In other news, Nellakir have now completed a full refurbishment program for Southern Peninsular Basketball at Rosebud with the first competition Basketball game scheduled for this Friday evening. The project included a full resanding, then recoating and repairs to this busy sports stadium’s sprung timber sports flooring. A full new logo was added to the centre of the court to complete the look, with all linemarkings refreshed and renewed. ‘Jump down’ is this weekend. Good luck to the Sharks!

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At the Knox Community Centre Rowville, Nellakir have undertaken a full revamp of the existing competition timber sports flooring. The replacement program will commence in December.

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And lastly for this report, Nellakir are commencing the replacement of the Sprung Timber Flooring of the Lowther Hall Early Learning Centre in Essendon. The flooring is an integral requirement for the school’s multipurpose and recital area.

With several other new projects to be announced in the near future, Nellakir is ensuring high quality competition sports surfaces and sprung timber surfaces for a full range of end uses right across Victoria and Tasmania.

If your club or competition, school or church requires a new floor using sprung timber, or need an effective costed maintenance program call Nellakir now on (03) 9467 6126 or drop us an email via our website.

Nellakir – The Sports Flooring for Champions

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Playing an Offence Game in Basketball – Part 2: Offensive Systems

A team’s offence can be structured in myriad ways with different alignments, sets, emphasis and methods of execution. The offence can be as complicated or as simple as a coach wishes or the ability of the players allows.

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Over the history of basketball, several standard offensive plays such as the Flex, Shuffle and Triangle have been used with great success as a solid foundation for team offence. They are built on standard patterns and if some of these standard patterns are learned, they will provide a good basis for a team offence.

I encourage coaches to develop their own philosophies within the context of a thorough understanding of the game. I will devote more detail to what has become known as the Melbourne Tigers Shuffle but also include other well-known methods that have brought success to many teams over many years.

The following examples of standard offences have been tried and tested over the years. If you base your own offence on any of them, choosing those that particularly suit your players and your philosophy, your chances of success will be improved.

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Implementing a team offence

Implementing an offence can help your team with its structure, balance, performance and results. By offence, I mean an offensive structure or set play that is used to get players open for good shots.

There are many offences in the world of basketball, though several seem to have been in the game forever and have certainly stood the test of time. I will discuss some of the standard offensive plays. If some of these patterns are learned they will provide a good basis for a team offence. I will devote more detail to what has become known as the Melbourne Tigers Shuffle but also include other well-known methods that have brought success to many teams over many years.

Coaches should be encouraged to develop their own philosophy within the context of a thorough understanding of the game. While the following examples of standard offences have been tried and tested over the years, you can adjust them to suit your players and your philosophy so your chances of success will be improved.

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The development of an offence takes time and requires considerable patience. There are no short cuts to success. The first step is to select a style of play that will suit the team and your own philosophy. The whole picture of the offence should be clear to the coach and he should make sure the players understand it. Once this is established the offence should be broken down into its parts that can be drilled. Two-man drills and three-man drills are used to develop the elements of the offence and then advance to four-on-four and five-on-five.

The structure of some offences may be quite complicated so coaches should be cautious about trying to include too much. It is preferable to include fewer elements and execute them well rather than try to include too much and execute them poorly. It is not advisable to change the offence constantly for this may create doubt or confusion in the players’ minds, but it is also undesirable to be too rigid to allow modifications to be used. The coach should be prepared to move with the times and make adjustments as the players’ skills improve and athletic abilities increase.

Part 1

Source: betterbasketball.com.au

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

The new court at Casey Indoor Stadium opens for business

Recently Nellakir completed works on the new Casey Indoor Stadium flooring. The venue has really started with a great opening round. Here is the report from Basketball Victoria on the Victorian Metro vs Victorian Country game that opened proceedings on the new court with over 1000 people attending the two game series.

The grand opening to the newly developed Casey Stadium proved to be a massive hit as over 1,000 people swept through the doors to see the first ever basketball game played at the brand new facility when Metro defeated Country in the two-game series.

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Metro hoisted the trophy for the second time in the concept’s short span, backing up from its aggregate win in Shepparton in 2016. There was no need for a count back this year however, with Metro winning both women’s and men’s games; in fact, winning all eight quarters across the two contests.

The crowd were given a spectacle in the opening half of the night, watching Metro’s Lucy Dawson (29 points, 8 rebounds) and the game’s most valuable player Jackie Vanderzaag (16 points, 19 rebounds, 7 assists, 4 steals) wreck havoc on the Country defence. Vanderzaag’s full time teammate at Waverley Sarah Yousef chimed in with a handy 13 points, five rebounds and seven assists as well.

Country only had one player in double figures in Tanarly Hood (18 points, 7 rebounds), however did find valuable contributors to keep the team in the game for the most part: Rebecca Noller (8 points, 5 rebounds), Lyndsey Hoogenhout (8 points, 8 rebounds, 4 blocks) and Caitlin Shadbolt (8 points, 3 rebounds).

The Casey locals saw their eyes light up at half-time of the women’s game, when local hero Raheem Lemons alongside Brandon Conley and Pat Golong produced ooo’s and ahh’s from the stands watching the three battle it out for the Rowville Community Bendigo Bank Dunk Contest.

Conley certainly made claims that his dunking resume was well respected, however Golong’s involvement with the Cavs community, dunking over three Casey junior players had the judges handing out perfect 10’s! Golong’s three dunks just edging out Conley to raise the trophy and the $500.

The opening quarter of the men’s game was simply an offensive juggernaut at both ends of the floor. The two teams put up a combined 68 points in the first quarter, setting the tone for what had an All Star flavour feel to it.

Metro chalked up triple figures before the end of the third and the game’s 250 points (135 to 115) is an Origin Series record for most points in a game.

Alex Bogart-King paced the Metro line-up with 26 points on a stellar 13-17FG from the floor, while five others finished in double figures including the game’s most valuable player Ivan Platenik (25 points, 9 rebounds, 2 steals).

Country found contributors in Jack Burnett (21 points, 7 rebounds) and Nick Ross (19 points), as well as Lewis Varley (17 points, 7 rebounds) and Michael Rebula (17 points, 8 rebounds).

Bendigo’s Jessie Rennie made the trip down all worthwhile, taking out the Rowville Community Bendigo Bank 3 Point Shootout, narrowly defeating Dandenong’s Amy Baum and Knox’s Taylor Lee. In an exciting concept, Rennie made them count when it mattered most, continuing her excellent in game shooting from deep throughout the 2017 Big V season.

As the clock wound down on another successful Origin event, Blackburn’s quartet led by head coach Paul Lankford wanted to make sure the crowd was leaving with highlights from the games. Vikes duo Brendan Trewella (18 points, 6 rebounds) and Jack Roberts (8 points, 3 steals) made sure of that, throwing down multiple thunderous jams in the final quarter.

Metro now take a 2-0 series lead as the 2018 Origin event heads back to a Country venue, where the locals will attempt to peg one back!

Women

Metro 80 (Dawson 29, Vanderzaag 19, Yousef 13) def Country 63 (Hood 18, Noller 8, Hoogenhout 8, Shadbolt 8)

Box Score

Men

Metro 135 (Bogart-King 26, Platenik 25, Trewella 18) def Country 115 (Burnett 21, Ross 19, Varley 17, Rebula 17)

Box Score

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.