Summer – the time to get fit

Nellakir continue with our tips on performance and this week, fitness.

Weight training

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In basketball power usually refers to an athlete’s ability to use maximum strength in the shortest possible time. This is an area that weight training can be most beneficial, any program should be carefully planned and supervised by a coach or trainer. I advise against the use of heavy weights because they tend to build up weight and a muscular physique while. basketball players should develop quick power to aid jumping and speed. A player should assess the maximum weight he can carry on a particular exercise, and then use half this weight for a series of eight to ten repetitions in the quickest time possible in sets of three.

The weight training routine should be repeated on alternate days. In the first week and effort should be made to reduce the time taken to complete the series. In the second week the weight may be increased by 5kg while still completing the series in the shortest time. The process of increasing weights gradually is maintained so long as the time to complete the series is not increasing.

Unless a player is undertaking a specific course planned for him by a qualified instructor, the only exercises he needs to do involving weights are half squats and heel raises. In other exercises body weight is enough resistance. Sometimes, however weight training can help recovery after injury.

Conditioning

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Quickness, endurance, flexibility and power

In basketball we are primarily concerned with improving quickness, endurance, flexibility and power. Training and playing is often enough exercise to develop and maintain these qualities, but where weaknesses are apparent there are specific exercises to improve them.

You will note I refer to ‘quickness’ rather than speed. A player’s ability to respond quickly to changes is his quickness and is an obvious advantage in such a fast moving game as basketball. To develop this quickness, agility drills, short sprints and ‘reaction drills’ are good on court drills to use.

Endurance is the quality that allows us to make a continuous effort and to recover quickly so the effort can be repeated. Endurance is not directly related to muscle strength, it is more a measure on how efficiently the heart and lungs can work to deliver oxygen to the muscles. Whenever time allows, long distance running should be included in your training scheme to improve endurance as well as normal on court basketball training in off season sessions. Build up the distance gradually starting with a two kilometre run three times a week and increasing the distance to between six and -10 kilometres three times a week during your six weeks pre-season program.

All effective training schemes are built on the principle of overload. In each session you should try to run that little bit further or that little bit faster, or just tackle one more repetition of an exercise. Without overload there can be no progress. This means you must increase your effort in exercising if you want to improve. Keep an accurate record of your training program so t your progress can be measured. Record the distance and time of your run and always try to reduce your time. When you feel you cannot reduce your time then the next step is to increase the distance. The same principle applies to your exercise and weight training.

Fitness demands that all the joints must move freely and the muscles that control them must be equally free for movement. The muscles must be able to contract easily and stretch to their limit so they are able to exert maximum power. A well balanced progressive exercise will improve flexibility. Exercises involving held stretches will help muscle strength and flexibility. With a simple exercise like touching your toes there should be a slow steady stretch and not a rapid stretch. If there is any weakness in a joint or muscle, the quick strain could cause an injury.

The most important point about any training scheme is consistency. Once you stop training de-training begins. You will lose some of the flexibility and endurance you have built up. So, regular and constant practice is essential, building up your daily routine gradually. Remember when training has been interrupted through injury or illness, don’t try to resume at the same level you left off, or you risk further injury. Unfortunately the rate of regaining fitness is not the same as the time spent away from training. If you have missed a week of training it will likely take two weeks to regain the same level as before the interruption.

The following exercises are useful for basketball conditioning and flexibility. All are capable of being used in the home environment.

Half squat alternated with heel raises. I am not in favour of using a full squat as it may place excessive strain on the knee joint. It is recommended that a plank of timber, or similar, about 50mm thick be used to set the heels on during half squats and the toes on during heel raises. These exercises are used primarily for improving jumping skills. Body weight is sufficient resistance to start a program using three sets of 10 repetitions alternating exercises. Weights attached to a bar may be used to increase the resistance as endurance and strength improves.

Sit-up alternated with press-up (using inclined bench if available) Three sets of ten repetitions alternating each exercise. Sit-ups are used to increase strength and endurance in abdominal muscles. When doing press-ups which help improve strength and endurance of shoulder and chest muscle some of the repetitions should use finger tips as well as l palms of the hands.

Burpee, alternating with star jump. The burpee has similar benefits as press-ups but also improvise flexibility. Hands are placed on the floor directly below the shoulders with knees tucked in next to the elbows. The hands and arms remain still as the feet are rapidly pushed back r to the full extended position so you are now in position to execute a press up. Without moving the hands and arms the knees are quickly brought forward to the original position.

The star jump improves flexibility of legs, arms and waist. Start in a normal standing position with hands resting at the sides and feet close together. Jump and shift the lags wide apart simultaneously raising both arms out and up so hands reach well above the head. Before landing the hands return to their starting position and the feet move together shoulder width apart. When landing the knees should bend slightly cushion the impact and prepare for another immediate star jump. Three sets of ten repetitions of each alternating exercise will improve flexibility and endurance.

Fitness

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Preparation is the basis for success in any field of endeavour, not just basketball. But like a coach is expected to prepare his team by practicing skills and rehearsing team methods, the players must also be prepared physically to take advantage of the thing learned in training. They must be fit and fuelled and be well aware of how to do both to maximise their performance.

In a well designed basketball program training for basketball it should not be necessary to improve player’s fitness and condition. The drills scrimmages and matches should normally be enough to maintain peak fitness unless the program is interrupted by injury or sickness. But because many clubs lack facilities and the opportunities for full scale practices are limited, players may need to work on their fitness and conditioning on an individual basis.

Teams playing at the highest level will usually have the services of highly skilled and qualified fitness advisors, medical practitioners, sport’s scientists and other professionals, but the vast majority of players do not have access to these services. Nevertheless peak fitness can be achieved and maintained if players follow a regular conditioning program and a balanced diet and lifestyle.

To get the best out of their natural assets, players should respect their bodies. Care should be taken to avoid handicaps that will reduce efficiency. Top performance in basketball is the result of peak fitness development through a planned training routine that includes adequate rest, proper diet, appropriate exercise, medical attention and the absence of excesses. A balanced diet includes a daily intake of enriched or wholegrain bread and cereals, meat, meat substitutes or fish, milk fruit and vegetables.

Players should be primarily concerned with maintaining their normal body weight. Any marked change in normal weight should be considered serious and medical advice sought. The cause of sudden weight loss may be deficient diet which a doctor can remedy, or it could be something more complicated which if treated promptly may enable the player to resume training sooner than otherwise possible.

There is ample evidence that smoking serves no useful purpose. It irritates the delicate membranes that line the lungs and causes coughing. Smoking can aggravate bronchitis, cause lung cancer, narrowing the blood vessels and shorten the breath. Breathing capacity is most important tor athletes. If the utilisation of oxygen in the body is hampered, as it is in smokers, the athlete’s stamina and performance must be affected.

Common sense indicates alcohol and basketball do not mix. Drinking alcohol can affect mental and muscular efficiency and regular drinkers often suffer nutritional shortages through neglect of a balanced diet. I have often told the joke about the wife who did not know that her husband drank until he came home sober one night. This analogy also applies to the athlete who does not know how fit he can be until he no longer drinks or smokes.

The pre-game meal is a contentious subject. There is overwhelming evidence that players should avoid eating for three or four hours before a game or training if they wish to achieve maximum performance. Some players say they dislike playing on an empty stomach and may eat just before a contest. I am amazed how some of these players get through the game and, of course some do suffer with stomach cramps or discomfort.

The desire for food is usually a nervous reaction. This is precisely why players should avoid eating immediately before a contest. It can take four to six hours for a meal to digest and even longer of the player is unusually tense or nervous before a major event. Any digestive problems can be magnified during the physical demands of a basketball game. It is much better to go into the game under-fed than over-fed. I usually suggest players eat the type of meal they prefer at least three hours before a contest.

When it comes to the pre-game meal it is recommended by sports scientists and nutritionists to eat foods that are high in carbohydrate. Spaghetti, pancakes, toast and honey are just three simple examples. These foods are easily digestible and provide the body with a ready supply of energy for the activity to come.

Source: betterbasketball.com.au, 2, 3

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

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Sports Flooring at its best – Nellakir for Construction and Maintenance

Holidays for some but not for Nellakir. as Victoria’s leading supplier of Sprung Timber Sports Flooring, not only are we busy with new constructions, but also with annual maintenance and court refurbishments.

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Nellakir have been confirmed as the new court construction team at Caroline Springs Leisure Centre. Two new state of the art multipurpose courts with sprung timber sports flooring will be constructed to competition specifications. The Courts will host Basketball, Netball and Futsal competitions, providing a real boon to the local area. See the full story here

As well new courts are also to be constructed at the Catholic Regional College Melton (multipurpose) and the Phoenix Sports Complex in Ballarat.

Over the break Nellakir will be refurbishing a number of Sprung Timber Sports Floored multipurpose sports courts.

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These include:

  • The Mill Park Basketball Stadium
  • The Whittlesea Stadium
  • The Hamilton Leisure Centre
  • St Albans Secondary College
  • Kurnai College Morwell
  • St Francis Xavier College in Berwick

…as well as the Heritage Listed North Melbourne Town Hall’s timber flooring. All are to be resanded after being worked back to bare timber.

It’s not too late to book cyclical maintenance for the holiday period. Nellakir will be operational throughout December and January, taking only the major public holidays off.

Call now on 03 9467 6126 or leave your details here and one of our friendly staff members will get back to you to discuss your needs and arrange a quotation.

Have a very Happy and Prosperous New Year – from the team at Nellakir.

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Rebound – Tips for your Basketball Competition Advantage

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This is a very busy period of the year for Nellakir with a range of new constructions and refurbishments (resand to bare timber) occurring over the Christmas – January break. More on this next week.

This week to help those budding champions along with their game we again feature some great tips on Rebounding for everyone out there to draw real benefit from.

Rebounding

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Rebounding is probably the best test of any player’s desire to get the ball. Everyone appreciates a good rebounder who jumps well and times his move to get to the basket accordingly. But jumping ability alone is not enough to guarantee good rebounding.

If you defend properly you will have manoeuvred yourself into a position between the offence and the basket to be ready to rebound, which is the last act on defence. The good rebounder always assumes the shot will miss so he, carries his hands at about shoulder height, pivots into the path between his opponent and the basket to box out, then attacks the ball aggressively. Remember you are defending the basket – if you can touch the ball without gaining control, tap it away from the danger area.

The outstanding athleticism of modern basketball players means more and more people can play above the rim. Merely standing under the basket area is no guarantee that you will rebound a missed shot. Athletic offensive players may jump from areas well away from the basket and still get their hands above ring and tip in missed shots. It is important for defenders to screen out offensive players as far from the ring as possible interrupting their momentum and taking away a direct path to the basket.

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If you are on offence and the defence has the inside position the same principles will apply, but you must try to fake and out-manoeuvre your defender to gain the front position to contest the rebound. In an ideal position you may go for the tip in, but it is usually better to regain possession for a controlled shot. Rip the ball down to just below the chin and then be aware of a possible outlet pass or go up aggressively for the shot. Sometimes a quick ‘pump’ fake may get the defender off balance.

There are different thought on blocking out for rebounds. Some coaches tell their players to pivot on their opponent, make contact and keep them out as far away from the basket as possible then go for the ball. Other coaches teach how to zone the basket by forming a triangle around the basket with players responsible for a particular area. Others say, just go hard at the basket. I believe the best method is to check the opponent’s path, then get after the ball without necessarily seeking contact before the rebound attempt. Teaching very young players how to pivot into the path of a defender, without causing a blocking foul is important. Once the players develop a ‘habit’ of locating their opponent and pivoting to screen off a path to the basket it becomes an almost instinctive reaction and good rebounding follows.

Tips for better rebounding

  • The most important requirement in rebounding is a desire to get the ball.
  • A player must really need to get the ball to become a great rebounder.
  • Check your opponent then get after the ball.
  • Use short sharp steps to gain position and then jump evenly off both feet.
  • In the final preparation before rebounding bend your knees and hold your elbows away from your body, with both hands just about shoulder height.
  • Defensive players should pivot to the outside for a quick outlet pass. If you cannot control the rebound tip the ball away.
  • Offensive players should anticipate where the ball will come off the rim and get to that position. Tap the ball if you cannot get two hands to control the rebound.
  • Work on your physical condition so you are able to make several repetitive rebounding attempts in the one play situation. Skipping rope is an excellent conditioner.

Source: betterbasketball.com.au

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Remember, chances are if your sprung timber flooring competition court has real bounce – it’s a Nellakir

Nellakir – Flooring for Champions

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Netball shines at first ever Australian and New Zealand Kids’ Choice Sports Awards

In the last 12 months, Nellakir has been involved in the building of up to 16 new Multipurpose Courts at Schools featuring Sprung Timber Sports Flooring and in a number of cases, Retractable Stadium Seating. These courts are used by local and regional teams in Netball competition which in turn fosters the sport of Netball at a local level. Nellakir is proud to support the sport of Netball and by providing the very best in Sports Flooring ensures that tomorrow’s and today’s champions play on the best possible competition surfaces.

From Netball Australia News:

Netball shines at first ever Australian and New Zealand Kids’ Choice Sports Awards

Two Suncorp Super Netballers have taken out honours at Australia and New Zealand’s first ever Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Sports Awards.

GIANTS Netball’s Jamie-Lee Price was named ‘Next Big Thing’, with Sunshine Coast Lightning’s Laura Langman awarded the ‘Hands of Gold.’

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Jamie-Lee Price

Jamie-Lee Price is an agile midcourter who spent most of her junior netball playing in New Zealand. In 2017, she made the move across the ditch to progress her career in Australia’s domestic competition, Suncorp Super Netball with GIANTS Netball, runners up in the inaugural Grand Final.

In her first year playing in the national league on Australian soil, Jamie-Lee also represented Australia at the Netball World Youth Cup in Botswana where she was named Player of the Tournament.

The Next Big Thing nominees are superstars of the future, on the rise; this award could be all it takes to rocket them from the field into folklore.

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Laura Langman

Laura Langman was instrumental in the club’s premiership-winning debut season. A veteran of 141 consecutive Test matches, Langman represented New Zealand from 2005-2016 but was ineligible for selection this year while playing in Australia. She will step away from netball in 2018.

The Hands of Gold nominees are palm-ministers, born with fingers of fury. They drop nothing, they stop everything – their limbs are legendary!

After six weeks of voting, Nickelodeon unveiled kids’ favourite athletes when the one-hour special premiered on Nickelodeon and FOX SPORTS 503 tonight. Male and female athletes from a variety of sports took out the top honours in this slime-filled celebration of sports stars.

Source: netball.com.au

Netball is a fantastic sport. It provides an excellent outlet for girls and women to enjoy a truly competitive sport. And now that it has been accepted as an Olympic Sport, our next Gold Medalist may well be learning their craft at your local Indoor Court.

Nellakir is the Sports Flooring for Champions.

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Nellakir works with Schools in maintaining High Grade Sprung Timber Sports Flooring

We reprint here in full an article from School News, a national magazine distributed to all primary and secondary schools Australia wide. it features an interview with Nellakir Managing Director Rick Allen on both the Construction of Sprung Timber Sports Flooring for indoor school stadiums as well as some useful tips on the ongoing maintenance of Timber Sports Flooring to ensure its optimum performance for years to come.

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Sprung Timber Sports Floors for Sustained Performance

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State Netball and Hockey Centre with Sprung Timber Sports Flooring by Nellakir

In term four it’s time to regenerate sports fields and empty your school pool for cleaning (if you have one). This is the period for any large scale maintenance to occur, while the clatter of not so tiny feet is heard elsewhere, and the school is quiet.

Multi-purpose sports halls take some punishing traffic throughout the school year and require constant attention. The life expectancy of sports surfaces ranges from 15 to more than 50 years, with various options available to suit a multiplicity of sports. Each substance requires a material-specific maintenance and replacement regime – and all will underperform if this is not adequately managed.

Sharing the mantle with Christmas and New Year, summer holidays in Australia can be a difficult time to get things done; thinking ahead is imperative. School News consulted Rick Allen from Nellakir, for the lowdown on a maintenance schedule for existing sprung timber floors, and what’s involved with installing new timber flooring for your sporting facility.

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Industry View

Mr Allen says indoor sprung timber flooring is gaining popularity, and that government subsidies have mitigated the drain on the budget, making it well worth a look. “In Victoria, for example, the Private Partnership Project (PPP) has facilitated the construction of new sprung timber sports floors at government schools across regional and Metropolitan Melbourne.”

He says the Victorian government has undertaken to co-fund facilities at primary schools that will be available to local sporting competitions outside school hours. “The rationale behind the PPP is to fully embed the school in local community and neighbourhood life.”

“Nellakir has constructed sprung timber floors for eight of these new PPP sports facilities since the PPP began in 2016, and the the courts are used by the schools as well as for the broader local community.”

“Sprung timber sports floors are shaping up as the top pick for government initiatives, and the trend is extending to other states,” he said. “The Victorian government has commissioned the construction of the state’s first ‘vertical’ school in Ferrars St, South Melbourne. Nellakir is providing a multipurpose, sprung timber sports floor for the school – with a full size indoor court suitable for basketball, netball, volleyball, gymnastics, and for school assemblies.”

Mr Allen says the reason for the shift towards sprung timber is its high level of resilience, durability and sustained performance. “Its long life expectancy is an attractive prospect, especially when dealing with a provider that can offer schools a life-time maintenance service.”

“While installing sprung timber flooring ensures students are playing on surfaces primed for premium sports competition, these school gyms do draw a crowd. With local basketball, netball and volleyball competitions using the facilities, they sustain heavy traffic, which makes for real wear and tear.”

“Timber is a ‘living’ material,” he continued. “It requires regular treatment, to ensure it maintains bounce and surface regularity.”

“The surface of the court has a specialist coating of oil modified urethane that enables the glide, the speed, and reliability players depend upon in all levels of competition. On busy court surfaces, re-application should occur annually.” Mr Allen says superficial maintenance requirements should be minimal: “Line markings should only be required at re-sand, except in cases where regular maintenance has not occurred.”

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Maintenance Schedule

Sprung timber floors require a simple re-coating every 12 months to maintain the high level of surface quality and slip resistance – while a complete re-sanding should occur every seven to 12 years. The annual re-coating replenishes the floor, according to Mr Allen, though regular examination of the surface is advised. “Sport finishes are designed for grip, and the time it takes to wear will also depend on the extent and frequency of use.”

“Re-coating maintains the grip required from the floor for elite sports action, maintains essential safety features especially important for schools – and lastly, it maintains the aesthetic appeal.”

“With wear and tear and the build-up of finishes (coatings), re-sanding brings sports flooring back to the original brand-new state,” he explained.

The process involves a total sanding back of the floor. The surface then requires reapplication of the finish and protective coatings that give sprung timber sports floors that sleek, polished appearance.

Long-range upkeep, will eventually involve removal and replacement. “After a specified period of time, which will depend on usage, upkeep, and wear and tear, sports flooring will need replacing,” Mr Allen advised.

In the ‘cosmetic repair’ category, line markings may need to be refreshed. A variation in line markings may also be required, when new sports are embraced by the school community.

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Stadium seating

Specific seating designed to sit safely atop the gloss finish of the sprung timber flooring is also recommended. To guard against slip-related accidents, as well as damage to the flooring from abrasive materials, seating can be sourced from timber floor providers.

“Regular safety assessments of flooring and seating should be conducted by your provider,” Mr Allen noted. “From a public liability perspective, this process is highly recommended.”

Receiving monitoring and maintenance on both flooring and seating from the original installer means “all repairs to stadium seating are based on original specifications, ensuring required integrity and functionality”. Mr Allen says sprung timber sports floors have gained the confidence of schools; sporting clubs and associations, and governments, due to their versatility, long product life, and aesthetic appeal. He said, “if an experienced supplier with a comprehensive service package is involved, the installation takes the skinned knees out of netball and the headaches out of maintenance for years to come”.

Source: School News

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Tips for Passing

Chest Passing

The two hand chest pass is the first pass to master. The fingers of both hands are on the ball with the thumbs behind it. The ball should be held comfortably at just below chest height. The there is a slight lowering of the ball as if starting to draw a circle outwards then inwards and upwards. This rotation of the ball enables a forward thrust toward the target. In doing so the passer makes a short step forward to maintain balance and increase the power of the pass. At the completion of the pass the arms are fully extended and the hands are turned inside out with the thumbs pointing down.

Bounce Pass

The bounce pass is executed in the same way as the chest pass, The receiver provides a good target but in order to reach the target the passer must bounce the ball just beyond the feet of the defender ensuring the ball bounces up to about the level of the waist of the receiver. The bounce pass is slower than the chest pass but sometimes necessary to counter the defender who carries his hands high in an effort to deflect a chest pass.

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Baseball Pass

The baseball pass is most often used for longer distance for example when making a long outlet pass after a rebound, or perhaps when a full court pass is needed to reduce the time advancing the ball to the front court .Assuming a right hand pass, the ball is brought up to just behind the right ear. The left arm is used for balance and extended out pointing in the direction of the pass. All of the body weight is on the pivot foot, in this case the right foot. The left foot is raised and as a step forward is taken the right hand propels the ball forward. The right arm is fully extended in the direction of the pass and the right foot steps forward to complete the action.

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Overhead Pass

The overhead pass is useful when being defended closely. A quick fake and a pass over the head of the defender can be effective especially when trying to feed a player cutting to the basket, or making an outlet pass after a rebound. The ball is raised above the head with arms almost fully extended. Drop the elbows and with a strong wrist action while stepping forward the ball is released. The hands are turned inside as with the chest pass and thumbs pointing down . There is not the same full arm extension like the chest pass, as you are more likely to make contact with the closely guarding defender, but more of a “snapping motion”.

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One Hand Push Pass

The one hand push pass is used more frequently when trying to counter a closely guarding defender. Good balance and control is necessary. A cross over step in front of the defender and toward the receiver may help protect the ball. A pass may be made directly to the receiver or a one hand bounce pass might be more appropriate. In some cases the action may be similar to a baseball pass except the pass is made from about waist level rather than above the shoulder.

Sources: betterbasketball.com.au 2 5

 

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

Nellakir to build new courts for the Caroline Springs Leisure Centre

Nellakir are about to commence work on a new major project. With State Government funding directed to local Government via its ‘Growing Suburbs Fund’, the City of Melton is now proceeding with major extensions to the Caroline Springs Leisure Centre in Melbourne’s outer west. This is a $2.5 million project. With huge population growth in the region, local Basketball competitions were totally restricted and unable to field further teams even though their was real demand. Consequently many young players just could not get a game on a regular basis. This is all about to change.

Nellakir will be constructing two new internal state of the art multipurpose courts with sprung timber sports flooring to competition specifications. Basketball, Netball and Futsal (Indoor Soccer) will be played on the new courts.

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It’s a very exciting development for the region with 12 Hardcourt Tennis Courts and nighttime lighting (with one show court included) and 3 Hotshot courts for juniors wishing to learn Tennis is also being constructed. An external competition size Netball court is a major feature as well.

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Here are two press releases from the City of Melton giving full details.

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Caroline Springs Leisure Centre Extension

Caroline Springs Leisure Centre Expansion Begins

Nellakir is please to be involved in this excellent project that sees the fostering of local Basketball, Netball and Futsal competitions with a major youth demographic.

Nellakir – Sports Flooring for Champions.

 

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.