Melbourne Vixens blow West Coast Fever away.

The Melbourne Vixens are powering into a season defining winning streak. This weekend they meet the Collingwood Magpies at their home court – the Margaret Court Arena Melbourne.

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Suncorp Super Netball 18/02/2017 Round 1 Vixens v Magpies Photo: Grant Treeby

The Vixens home court is Arena Stadium at the State Netball and hockey Centre in Brens Rd Parkville. The show courts and all timber sports flooring at the centre was constructed by Nellakir – Victoria and Tasmania’s leading construction and maintenance team for Competition Level Sprung Timber Flooring. Nellakir exclusively use ASF/Horner Sports Flooring systems, providing the best competition surfaces for both Netball and Basketball in the State – a surface that continue to power the Melbourne Vixens to further victories. Here is a report on last week’s game in Perth.

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Melbourne Vixens upset West Coast Fever, keep finals hopes strong

Melbourne Vixens won’t be going quietly.

The Vixens are far from certain finalists after a mixed start to the Super Netball season but on Saturday they showed just how good they can be with a comprehensive 74-60 win over ladder-leaders West Coast Fever at Hisense Arena.

Melbourne claimed seven of the eight possible points giving their hopes of moving up into the top four from sixth position every chance.

To make it the Vixens will need more wins and a healthy dose of bonus points from their remaining seven games but this win was the blueprint of how they can get it done.

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The Vixens offered starring performances across the court as they zoned off defensively and forced the visitors into errors while in attack Tegan Philip (25 goals from 31 shots) showed a burst of match-winning speed in the first half shooting 15 goals as the Vixens led by 16 goals at half time.

Shooter Mwai Kumwenda (49 goals from 51 shots) was as prolific as always while Kate Moloney and Liz Watson were constants at both ends and Renea Ingles showed she has fast regained her elite edge in wing defence.
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“We have had a really good two weeks during the bye, we have been working really hard towards playing the netball they are capable of producing,” Vixens coach Simone McKinnis said.

“They saw the rewards tonight, the work rate was consistent across the four quarters.

“There is no easy answer or easy way of beating that sort of team, it is just doing the hard work

“They were prepared for what they had to do and they did it.”

McKinnis praised the shooting of Kumwenda and the run of Philip adding Ingles showed the fruits of hard training during the bye.

“I think she has gone up another level today and the more she is out there, the better she will become,” McKinnis said.

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Fever coach Stacey Marinkovich said her side had to learn their lessons from the loss.

“They really put us under a lot of pressure with the way they contested and their hands over right down the court,” Marinkovich said.

“It was a very clinical, Victorian style of play. They executed well and did it for very long periods of time.

Both teams looked up for the contest in the opening 10 minutes as they traded goals and and leads.

Then the Vixens found their grove with one turnover eliciting a scream from captain Moloney as her side took a 17-14 lead into quarter time then took the contest away from the Fever.

That second quarter was not just owned by the cunning play of Philip but the team defence of the Vixens who repeatedly forced turnovers or errant passes from the Fever as defenders Emily Mannix and Jo Weston made life difficult for dominant shooter Jhaniele Fowler (56 goals from 60 shots) while wing defence Renae Ingles smothered multiple wing attacks leaving nearly all the playmaking to the overworked Verity Charles and Nat Medhurst.

An eight-point Vixens lead forced a time out from the Fever but upon the restart a turnover and follow up goal saw that lead enter double figures.

From there it kept climbing and the Vixens would have been happy for the term to go beyond 15 minutes as they went into half time up 43-27.

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The Fever haven’t fluked their strong start to the season and bring Kaylia Stanton into goal attack and moving Medhurst to wing attack led to a much closer third term as Stanton offered another shooting option outside of Fowler.

An 18-14 quarter meant the Fever would at least take a point from the game.
The Fever went for broke to start the final term cutting the lead to nine as they went back to feeding long balls into Fowler but the Vixens finished strongly to claim the final term.

Ingles made an intercept early in the final term which brought a big cheer from 5838 home fans, just as Ingles is finding her feet after a late start to 2018, so are her Vixens.

The Vixens and Collingwood Magpies square off in their second meeting at the season at Margaret Court Arena this coming Sunday at 1pm.

Source: smh.com.au

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For expert construction and programmed maintenance of all Timber Sports Flooring, call Nellakir on 9467 6126 for a free no obligation quote on all services.

Nellakir – the Sports Flooring of Champions.

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

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Bendigo Stadium Redevelopment Completed – New Show Court Opens For Business

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Recently in Bendigo, the city’s new show court at Bendigo Stadium staged its first competition match and was officially opened. Over 3000 people attended a women’s match between the Bendigo Braves an the Sandringham Sabres. The Braves won by 32 points.

Nellakir are proud to have built the new premium sports flooring surface (Sprung Timber Sports Flooring by ASF Horner Sports Floors) in collaboration with the appointed builder Fairbrother Pty Ltd. The new court and surface are of a standard to permit NBL games to be played on the FIBA (Federation of International Basketball Associations) approved surface.

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Bendigo Stadium redevelopment gets massive thumbs up from basketball fans

BENDIGO Stadium’s $23-million expansion has lived up to the hype, according to fans and players at Friday night’s first game.

More than 3000 people packed into the stadium’s new show court, which was christened with a 32-point win by the Bendigo Braves women over SEABL rivals Sandringham Sabres.

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The 92-60 triumph was powered by a game-high 29 points and 12 assists from star point guard Kelly Wilson and 25-points and eight rebounds from Nadeen Payne.

Plenty in the stands looked in awe of the city’s newest sports and entertainment venue.

Braves season ticket-holder Jeremy Burns said he could not have been more impressed with the new show court.

“It’s massive – the size of it is just unreal. It’s way bigger than I was expecting,” he said.

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“It’s very modern and looks like something you would find in Melbourne.

“It’s definitely something we can be proud of in Bendigo. What other city in regional Victoria would have a venue like this for 4000 people?”

John Russell, whose son plays junior basketball in Bendigo, described it as “super-sensational’.

“It’s a brilliant stadium and fantastic for the City of Greater Bendigo.”

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Equally impressed were locals Joanne and Tom Lewis.

The mother and son, who live just minutes from the stadium, were attending their first basketball game after winning tickets in a radio station promotion.

“We watched it (the development) slowly appear and get bigger and bigger every time we drove past it and suddenly its finished,” Mrs Lewis said.

“Initially we had no idea it was being built.

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“We have come to the venue for dinner before, but never the basketball, so this is a night out. It’s massive.”

Son Tom was most impressed with the giant Jumbotron hoisted above centre court and following his first taste of live basketball action, quickly vowed to be back for more Braves games.

A special night for the Braves was even sweeter for basketballer Payne, who made history by scoring the first points on the new show court.

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The 24-year-old added seven of the Braves’ next 14 points and had 16 by half-time.

Payne described scoring the first points as pretty cool before quickly deflecting credit for the Braves’ ninth-straight win this season to her team-mates.

“It’s amazing to play with a group like this, it’s very rare and I am enjoying every single moment,” she said.

“We’re happy to be 9-0, but that just leaves us with a target on our back now.

“Every week now we’ll just have train harder and prepare that bit better.”

A new era for Bendigo basketball was also a proud moment for the many former Braves players and officials in the crowd, among them Justin Cass, whose number six jersey was retired by the organisation.

Cass, who was ranked sixth in a Bendigo Advertiser list of greatest ever Braves to celebrate the club’s 25th anniversary in 2010, said he hoped the new stadium would be the catalyst for bigger games of basketball in Bendigo in the future.

“To me, playing all around Australia at all types of venues, this is one of the best I have ever been in,” he said.

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“(The old show court) looked pretty good, but when you walk into this place here, this is A1 class.

“Hopefully one day we might get some NBL games here and fill the place.

“Everybody who has been involved in this needs to pat themselves on the back as this is a great initiative.”

Meanwhile, the Braves men, led by 20 points, nine rebounds, eight assists and two steals, from Jeremy Kendle, staved off a gallant Sabres to win 81-73.

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Source: bendigoadvertiser.com.au

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

 

Nellakir use Australasian Sports Flooring Horner Systems – exclusively – with Pacific Seating retractable seating.

Nellakir use Australasian Sports Floors sprung timber sports floors exclusively. Australasian Sports Flooring systems are the only FIBA approved systems available in Oceania (Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific). ASF Horner Hardwood Flooring has been setting the industry standard since 1891. International events such as the Sydney Olympic Games 2000, the Los Angeles Championships of Basketball, World University Games, Pan American Games, Goodwill Games, European Championships and since 1983 every NCAA Final Four game and NBA All-Stars games are all played on the ASF Horner flooring systems.

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Nellakir use Forestry Certified Flooring ensuring a fully Sustainable Flooring System. Nellakir utilises ASF Horner flooring, ASF Horner exclusively use selected plantation timbers as opposed to Native Forest coups. To ensure ongoing sustainability, Court managers and organisations can adopt the ’S’ maintenance program upon completion. Nellakir use ASF Horner timbers with full Forestry Certification. The certification means a complete history of the hardwood flooring surface can be supplied to the client. Forestry Certification certificates validate that all environmental and government regulations with regard to Forestry production have been adopted and adhered to.

Nellakir also provides the Pacific Seating range of Stadium Seating – “The next Generation in Retractable Seating Systems” – The Glide Series.

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The Glide system is quieter to operate, stronger in its design and more user friendly for facility staff. Glide provides individual seating for each patron (no platform seating) – space for every person. The VR1 system provides Disabled patrons with a simple solution as standard specification.

 

seating007d colour chartThe Glide Series is superb in Competition Court situations. For multipurpose facilities and gymnasiums the SBS Seat is the recommended option. Comfortable, generous seat spaces, ergonomically contoured for spectator comfort. A standard range of bright, warm colours is available – or you can choose a combination of colours to suit your purposes from the SBS seat colour range.

The Cook Seat is the most popular seating option in the Pacific Seating range. This seat provides numerous different applications. An economical nose mounting seat with a folding back or as a riser mounted seat with a tip up base. Options provide you the client with the best seating arrangement for your purposes. Variable seat spaces and heights are available.

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For further information both on ASF Horner Sprung Timber Sports Flooring systems and on the accompanying Pacific Seating purpose built retractable seating, please call 03 9467 6126 to book an appointment for a free consultation. Or leave your details here and our support staff will contact you to assist you with your enquiry.

Nellakir – for Expert Construction and Programmed Maintenance of all Sports Flooring.

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Nellakir – the Sports Flooring for Champions.

Nellakir Projects Continue to Develop School Precincts State Wide

This year Nellakir has focussed a lot of attention on developing new facilities in both existing and new schools. From full Basketball/Netball Courts at competition standard, to Drama Rooms where special flooring and staging is created, and even Dance Floors – Nellakir are the Sprung Timber Flooring experts. All Sports Flooring utilises Australian Sports Flooring systems (ASF) and is simply the highest standard.

This week sees the Viewbank College project, a Drama Room, purpose built with specialised timber flooring nearing completion.

As well at Mercy College in Coburg, the materials to develop the sprung timber flooring for their special purpose flooring have now been delivered. Work will start in the very near future.

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Basketball/Netball Courts are being commenced in the next few weeks at both Bentleigh Primary School and at Carnegie Primary School. The courts will be utilised for competition after hours by the local communities.

Courts are also being constructed at the Sandringham East Primary School, the Port Melbourne Primary School and the Springside West Secondary College located at Fraser Rise, on the western edge of Melbourne near Sydenham – a new school.

Another Drama Room is to be built at Keysborough College with Nellakir building a purpose designed sprung timber floor and staging.

At Federation University in Ballarat the Nellakir team have commenced building a purpose built Dance Floor. This is at the Mt St Helen’s Ballarat Campus. Again it is a sprung timber dance floor, which in itself is interesting as all dance floors in Ballrooms and historic homes were always Sprung Timber flooring.

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Two well known community buildings have received a full maintenance makeover recently. The first is the Lynda Blundell Community Centre in Blair St Dallas, a community venue of long standing in the Broadmeadows area, the hall floor and stage were fully sanded and recoated (resealed).

The second such building is the Kelly Park Centre in Werribee, a popular community venue where again the Hall area flooring and stage were re-sanded and recoated (resealed) as well.

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And to end the report, the new Basketball Court at St Francis College Beaconsfield has now been completed. With the previous court being water damaged beyond repair, Nellakir have now built a new competition level court featuring Sprung Timber Sports Flooring.

If you or your organisation require a Maintenance Program, repairs or perhaps a complete re-construction of your Sports Flooring, don’t hesitate to call Nellakir on 9467 6126 or leave your contact details here and one of our helpful staff will get back to you to make an appointment for a free, no obligation quote. Nellakir – for Expert Construction and Programmed Maintenance of all Sports Flooring.

Nellakir – The Sports Flooring of Champions.

 

School Holidays – Perfect for Court Maintenance

With the School Holidays currently upon us it’s timely to consider cyclical maintenance of your sprung timber sports flooring, by Nellakir the premier supplier of quality sports flooring in Victoria and Tasmania.

Whether it’s re-coating, re-sanding or re-marking of court lines, Nellakir will schedule your required maintenance during the term 2 holidays from the 30th of June to the 15th of July, providing a full premium service that ensures the best possible surface upon the commencement of Term 3.

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With many school courts now doubling as Community facilities, wear and tear on the timber surface is much higher with constant use. Many such courts constructed under the State Government’s PPP programs (Public Private Partnerships) see usage day and night, 7 days per week with Basketball, Netball, Badminton, Volleyball and gymnastics all utilising this premium sport flooring. Competitions range from school to Junior, Adult and Veteran formats with local leagues embracing the new facilities with enthusiasm.

Maintenance programs include re-surfacing of existing sprung timber floors in stadiums, halls and gymnasiums as well as timber flooring in churches and community centres.

Re-coating should occur every 12 months and periodically it will be necessary to re-sand floors, then re-coat and provide new line marking.

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Grip is the most important factor with Timber Sports Flooring. Re-coating maintains this grip and is aesthetically pleasing. Re-sanding is required within 7–12 years. It removes buildups that occur due to re-coating and returns the floor to its original state.

Ultimately there comes a time when the flooring itself will require replacement. Nellakir use the proprietary sports flooring system of ASF Horner, a tried and true system used widely throughout Australia on Competition Sports Flooring in major stadiums nationally.

Call Nellakir now on 9467 6126 and arrange a free quotation on all your Sprung Timber Sports Flooring requirements – construction or maintenance.

Select the best – Nellakir, for expert construction and programmed maintenance of all sports flooring.

Nellakir complete several large projects – and the latest Defence Tips

Nellakir have now completed the new replacement Sports Flooring for Rowville Community Centre’s Basketball Courts, and it’s agreed by all it’s come up a real treat. This week the South Melbourne Multi Storey Primary School Basketball Court in Ferrars St South Melbourne also reaches completion. And if you love Basketball, here’s the final excerpt on Tips for Defence. Play Ball!

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Understand Your Opponent

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26. Are They a Great Outside Shooter?

The number one factor that determines how you should play against your opponent on defense is whether they can shoot the basketball from the outside at a high percentage.

If you’re guarding a poor shooter, then you can assist your teammates with more help off the basketball and you know that when playing on-ball defense you can take an extra step back to defend the drive without fear that they’ll make the shot.

If you’re guarding a great shooter, you won’t be able to help as much and you must be more mindful of your rotations on defense.

Instead, you should close the space between you and the defender and force them to dribble inside and take a lower percentage shot.

This is why smart basketball coaches put great off-ball defenders on poor shooters.

27. Where/How Do They Score Most of Their Points?

Whether they’re a great outside shooter or not, most players will have certain areas of the floor or certain ways that they score the majority of their points.

To be a great basketball defender, you must work out where and how your opponent does most of their scoring.

Do they get most of their points running off screens and getting midrange shots?

Do they score most of their points driving to the rim and finishing with their right hand?

Do they have a deadly midrange pull-up game?

Are they a low-post specialist?

These are questions you must figure out the answer to for every offensive player that you play against.

28. Do They Prefer Dribbling With Their Right or Left Hand?

Figuring out whether to influence your opponent’s dribbling to the right or left is one of the most important and easiest things you can do to improve your defense.

How you’ll implement this knowledge during the game might vary due to team defensive rules, but understanding their preference is crucial.

More often than not, the player you’re competing against will prefer to drive to their right hand.

To force them to their opposite hand, position yourself so that you’re slightly overplaying their preferred side and then establish a higher lead foot on this side too.

From this stance, the only way they can drive on their preferred side is to dribble through your chest and receive an offensive foul or to retreat dribble around you which will provide enough time to establish position again.

If they were to drive on their opposite hand, you’re still in position so that you can contain them and cut off the driving lane.

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29. What Are Their Weaknesses?

As well as figuring out their strengths, it’s important to know what an opponent’s weaknesses are.

This knowledge will assist you to put them in uncomfortable situations by forcing them into performing what they’re not good at.

This will require watching tape of your opponent, watching them play live, or simply working it out as the game progresses.

Every single player on the planet has weaknesses. It’s your job to find out what they are and exploit them.

30. How Do They Respond to Pressure?

One of the most surprising differences between great offensive players is their ability to handle pressure being put on them.

I’ve seen many players who regularly average 25 points per game but when you put a high amount of pressure on them, their point totals automatically take a significant drop.

These are often the player who can’t mentally handle pressure from great defense. They get frustrated, start yelling at their teammates, and throw up shots from all over the court trying to reach their regular scoring numbers.

Conversely, there are many great offensive players who stay calm and will have the same impact as usual regardless of the defensive pressure.

For that reason, it’s important to know which category your opponent falls under and then use that knowledge to improve your defense against them.

31. Do They Crash the Offensive Glass?

There are many players who do a fantastic job of sprinting in for offensive rebounds and then either scoring or passing out to a teammate for an open shot.

Shots after offensive rebounds always seem to be great shots.

As a defender, you must be aware whether the player that you’re guarding has a tendency to sprint in for offensive rebounds or to run back on defense after each shot.

If they are a great offensive rebounder, you must ensure to make contact with them after every shot and put a high importance on keeping them off the glass.

Understand the Opposition’s Offense

32. What Offense Are They Running?

One of the first questions that smart defenders will ask themselves when determining how to defend their opponent is “What offense does the opposition run?”

Once you figure this out, the next step is to determine the best way to defend against it.

Here are a few of the question you should think about…

How do they initiate the offense?

What’s the regular passing sequence of their offense?

Where do they take most of their shots from?

For example: If an opponent’s offense always starts with a pass from the top to one of the players on the wing, you then know that if you completely deny this pass then you’ve effectively taken them out of their offense.

33. What Are Their Most Common Set Plays

Often you’ll come across teams that don’t have an offense at all and will rely solely on set plays to score the basketball.

Since most youth and high school teams only have 2 – 3 set plays that they run a majority of the time, it can be relatively simple to figure out the name of the set play and what their actions are.

Just like the previous tip, your goal is to figure out what the opposition are trying to do and then take those options away from them.

The best time to do this is before the game. Watch video of the opposition’s offense or to watch them in-person and focus on figuring out what they do offensively.

If you don’t have that opportunity, with focus you can figure it out throughout the game as you’re competing against them.

On-Ball Basketball Defense Tips

34. Put Constant Pressure on the Basketball

While the main goal is containment, we don’t want players to do this by standing 2 meters off their opponent and giving them wide open shots.

Players must learn how to contain their player while also putting constant pressure on them when they have the basketball.

The purpose of putting pressure on the basketball is to make the offensive player uncomfortable which will often lead to deflections and turnovers.

When a player is uncomfortable from on-ball pressure, they don’t want to dribble the basketball, they’re scared that one of their passes will get deflected, and they don’t even think about shooting.

As long as your teammates are playing great help defense, you shouldn’t hesitate to apply on-ball pressure because if the offensive player does happen to beat you off the dribble, your teammates are ready to rotate and stop the basketball.

“My philosophy of defense is to keep the pressure on an opponent until you get to his emotions” – John Wooden

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35. Stay Lower Than Your Opponent at All Times

When you’re playing on-ball defense, you should always be lower than your opponent.

If you’re roughly the same height, your eye level should be at approximately their shoulder level.

Being lower gives you better balance and allows you to react quickly once the offensive player makes their move.

As always, the quicker you can react, the better.

36. Don’t Lunge for the Basketball

This tip goes back to the importance of balance that I talked about in the first section of this article on basketball defense.

When you lunge for the basketball, you’re often putting yourself off-balance and out of correct defensive position.

If the basketball comes within your reach, by all means, attempt to tip it and secure the steal, but never lunge out of position unless you’re over 75% sure you’re going to steal the basketball.

Always remember that containing your opponent is your number one priority when playing on-ball defense.

37. Stay an Arm’s Length Distance From Your Opponent

One of the most common questions I get asked by players is how close they should be to their opponent when playing defense.

On average, a player should be approximately one arm’s length away from their opponent. This means that if you stick your hand out straight, you should just be able to touch the offensive player with your fingertips.

As players improve to higher and more skilled levels of basketball, the distance will start to vary depending on the tendencies and abilities of the player they’re guarding against. But for the youth and high school level, this is often the most appropriate distance.

Being an arm’s length apart is the perfect length because it’s close enough that the defender can get a hand on the basketball for a steal and also prevent the shot, but far enough away that if the player attempts to drive there’s enough to react and adjust defensive position.

38. Watch Your Opponent’s Chest or Waist

This tactic will make an immediate impact on your defensive ability.

When players are still learning the game, the natural tendency is to look at the basketball or the eyes when playing on-ball defense.

The problem with doing this, however, is that it’s easy for the offensive player to fake with their eyes or the basketball and get the defense off-balance.

So, what should players be looking at while playing on-ball defense?

The mid-section of their opponent. This being anywhere from their chest to their waist.

Unlike the other parts of their body, it’s incredibly difficult for the offensive player to fake with their mid-section which is why that’s where I recommend players focus on.

39. Always Keep Your Hands Active

While you’re playing on-ball defense, you should be tracing the basketball with one of your hands at all times.

Doing so will allow you to deflect the basketball if the offensive player makes a quick pass inside and also simply discourages passes as your opponent knows you may get a hand to it.

Your other hand should be below the basketball looking to tap the basketball out of their hands or to poke it loose if the decide to dribble.

By leaving your hands down at your sides (which a lot of players do), you’re not achieving anything defensively.

Keep your hands active.

40. Swipe Up at the Basketball

Most players have formed a bad habit of swatting down on the basketball when attempting to reach in for a steal.

The problem with doing this is that the referee will often call the defender for a foul. It looks aggressive and there will often be contact made with the arm.

The better way to steal while playing on-ball defense is to swipe up at the basketball. This means keeping one of your hand’s lower than the basketball with your palm facing up.

Since the defender should be playing lower than the offensive player, this is a far more successful method and will result in fewer foul calls.

41. Contest Shots by Blocking the Shooter’s Vision

A cardinal on-ball defensive sin is jumping up and swatting at the basketball attempting to block an opposition player’s shot.

Although this can sometimes work, there are two main reasons why this isn’t always a terrific idea…

1. You might foul the shooter

It’s incredibly difficult to block an outside shot without fouling. The shooting motion of most players will often bring their arms directly into yours on the shot resulting in a foul.

2. They might fake the shot

If you jump on a shot fake, it’s game over. They’re going to have an open drive to the rim and if they don’t score themselves, they’ll often be able to pass to an open player for the shot or layup.

Instead, the best option you have when defending an outside shooter is to get your hand up to their face and take away their vision of the rim.

A missed shot is just as good as a blocked shot. Often better since most blocks are out of bounds or straight back to the opposition team.

This tactic allows you to stay on the ground and react quickly to whatever happens next.

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42. Always Jump to the Basketball After a Pass

One of the primary rules of defense is to never allow your opponent to cut ball-side of you after making a pass.

This most commonly occurs on a pass-and-cut when the opposition is swinging the basketball around the perimeter.

After making the pass, they will immediately look to cut ball-side for the for the give-and-go pass leading to an open layup.

Great defenders never allow this to happen.

Any time you’re guarding a player and they pass to a teammate, you must immediately jump towards the basketball on the flight of the pass.

This removes your opponent’s opportunity to cut ball-side and forces them to cut behind which is a much more difficult pass to make and puts you in prime position to intercept the pass if it’s attempted.

Even if they choose not to cut, you’re immediately denying the return pass to the player you’re guarding.

Off-Ball Basketball Defense Tips

43. One-Pass Away – Deny or Help?

One of the most important principles of your team’s defensive system you must understand is whether to deny when one-pass away or whether to be in help position.

This is the main difference between the two most popular defensive systems: The man-to-man defense (deny) and the Pack Line defense (help).

If you’re denying the pass, you should always have one arm and one foot in the passing lane, your chest should be facing your opponent, and you should see the basketball by looking over your ball-side shoulder.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the defensive system may not have a universal rule on this. The rule may change depending on where the basketball is on the court.

For example, some coaches prefer to allow the initial pass to the wing and then deny after that pass has been made.

Others might allow passes to the corner by playing in help position but deny any reversal pass back to the top of the key.

Make sure you understand your team’s defensive strategy when defending one-pass away from the basketball.

44. Learn How to Close Out Correctly

Close outs are one of the most difficult skills to master on defense.

In fact, there any many offenses and set plays designed specifically to create defensive closeouts as that’s often where a lot of defenses break down.

There’s no avoiding them. If your team is in help position (which they should be), then there will be close outs no matter what.

So how do you perform them effectively?

The key to closing out is to sprint approximately two-thirds of the way to the defender and then use short, choppy steps to finish the close out.

As a player gets close, they should be low with their weight back to absorb the drive and also have one hand up to deter or contest the shot.

45. Never Help Off Ball-Side Corner

The corner three-point shot is arguably the most efficient shot in the game of basketball. You should never leave this shot open.

A player will most commonly make this mistake when an opponent drives to the rim from the wing and they’re defending a player in the corner one-pass away.

Instead of staying on their opponent, this corner defender will drop down to help stop the drive to the rim leaving their player open for the simple pass and wide open jump shot.

Every player must understand that help comes from the middle. That’s why you must always have a defender on the split-line.

Help never comes from ball-side corner.

They can quickly plug and recover to their player, but they should never completely commit to helping on the baseline wing drive and leave open their opponent in the corner.

46. Always See Your Opponent and the Basketball

Whenever you’re on defense and you’re not defending the basketball or one-pass away, you should be in a ‘defensive triangle’.

The defensive triangle (or ball-you-man) refers to positioning yourself between the basketball and your opponent so that you can see both with your peripheral vision.

You should have one hand pointing towards the basketball, one hand pointing towards your opponent, and your vision should be in-between the two.

If a direct chest pass was made between the player with the basketball and your opponent, the help defender should be able to intercept it.

A defender should be as close to the basketball as possible but still close enough to their player that if a skip pass to them was made, the defender would have time to close out and establish defensive position without allowing an open shot.

The reason for this is that the closer a help defender is to the basketball, the quicker they can be to play help defense.

47. Constantly Adjust Your Positioning

A great basketball defender never stands still while they’re on defense. They’re constantly adjusting their positioning the entire possession.

Whenever the basketball or your opponent moves, you should be moving as well to make sure you’re always in the best defensive position.

This requires players to understand the defense to know where they should be, stay in a defensive stance to react quickly, and use the defensive triangle to keep vision of the player they’re guarding and the basketball.

If you’re not constantly adjusting your position, it won’t be long before you get caught out and your opponent gets a quick backdoor layup or a wide open jump shot.

Even if being caught out of position doesn’t lead to a direct score by your opponent, it will lead to a breakdown in the defense and the need for your teammates to rotate and help. This puts them out of position and usually leads to an high-quality shot from one of the opponents.

Your teammates need to trust that you’ll be in the correct position to help them just as they need to be in the correct position to help you.

Don’t let each other down with lazy defense.

Conclusion

Becoming a great basketball defender is one of the most important areas a player can focus on.

Since few players put a focus on defense, doing so is one of the best opportunities a player has of separating themselves from the crowd and advancing from a mediocre player to a great player.

If you implement the above tips into your game, very quickly you’ll see the impact that they can have on your game.

Source: basketballforcoaches.com

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.

More Defence Tips to perfect your team game in Basketball

Nellakir continue to announce new developments that will further junior, senior and elite competition in both Basketball and Netball as well as sports such as Volleyball, Badminton and Gymnastics. The best flooring for high level competition is Sprung TImber Sports Flooring. Nellakir are the leading suppliers of Sprung Timber Sports Flooring in Victoria and Tasmania. Next week we will announce a number of new projects and major maintenance to be commenced in the next few months. Meanwhile get back to perfecting your Basketball Defence Strategies. This week we provide tips 12 – 25 – play ball!

13. Use Your Time on the Bench Wisely

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When you do get subbed out of the game, don’t waste the opportunity you have to study the opposition team while you recover.

I’ll elaborate on the specific questions to think about later in the article…

But for now, here’s a brief summary…

  • What are the tendencies of the player you’ll be defending?
  • What are their strengths?
  • What are their weaknesses?
  • What offense is the opponent running?
  • Who are the best shooters on the team?
  • How do their set plays work?
  • etc.

14. Gain Possession of Every Loose Basketball

 

What coaches often refer to as 50/50 balls are when the basketball has been knocked away or deflected and both teams have an even chance of taking possession.

A player’s job is to turn the basketball from a 50/50 ball to an 80/20 ball. Meaning that when there’s a basketball loose on the floor, you’ll be the one who secures it 8 times out of 10.

In order to do this, players must be down in defensive stance ready to react at any moment and must also be willing to put their body on the line for the benefit of the team by diving on the basketball if the opportunity to do so arises.

Every single possession counts and these are the plays that will determine which team has had more scoring opportunities at the end of the game.

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15. Learn How to Use Your Body to Your Advantage

Fact: Basketball is a contact sport.

If you want to excel as a defender, you need to learn how to use your body to your advantage.

By allowing the offensive player to get anywhere they want on the court, you’re not doing a good job on defense.

Use your arm bar and lower body to move players away from where they want to catch the basketball. This goes for the low post and on the perimeter.

Cut off an opponent’s cutting lane by stepping in front and bumping them while making sure to keep your hands out to show you’re not pushing.

Players will learn to use legal physicality as they gain more experience and gradually face smarter and stronger competition.

16. Be Willing to Take a Charge

The other unselfish act a player can make on defense is being willing to put their body on the line and draw a charge.

Taking a charge is often a huge momentum changer and will make the opposition hesitate next time they’re around you.

If a player is dribbling or running in your direction, hold your position and when they make contact allow your body to fall straight backward while simultaneously forcefully blowing out air.

Is this flopping? Maybe.

Will they call the charge if you hold your ground and don’t allow your body to fall over? In 99% of the cases, no they won’t.

Whether we like it or not, being able to exaggerate a charge has turned into a skill in today’s basketball.

It will get your team extra possessions every game!

17. Improve Your Athletic Ability

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While a lot of it is innate, you can definitely improve your athletic ability if you’re working on the right things.

Remember how I talked about basketball being a game of inches earlier in the article?

Then it should be obvious that improving your athletic ability even slightly can often help you make up these inches and more.

I highly recommend players complete a vertical jump program during their basketball off-season.

Here is a link to an equipment-free 12-week vertical jump program that I created that can help any player gain a few extra inches on their vertical leap.

The other exercises I recommend are the use of ladders to improve foot quickness and even cone drills to improve explosiveness and acceleration.

18. Be a Student of the Game

All players who aspire to be great defenders need to be constantly improving their knowledge on the subject.

The best way to do this is by talking to great defenders about their thoughts on defense and also by watching great defenders.

In this day and age, one of the best ways to do that is by watching YouTube video breakdowns.

Here are a couple of my favorites…

Never stop improving your defensive knowledge.

19. Stop Complaining About Missed Calls

One of the most detrimental decisions a player can make for their individual defense and also for the team’s defense is to complain about missed calls.

Instead of sprinting back on defense, a player stops and complains to the referee about a call they believe should have been made but wasn’t.

When a player does this, it often leads to a 5 on 4 fast break resulting in an easy score for the opposition if they spaced the floor correctly.

A player who has ambitions to be a great defensive player can’t ever allow this to happen.

More than anything, a player must understand that referees are going to miss calls from time to time.

You must get back on defense immediately and if the lack of foul call does need to be brought up with the official, leave it for a stoppage in play or for the coach to do the talking.

20. Establish Post Position as Early as Possible

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One of the keys to great post defense is not allowing the opposition to establish early position.

Players competing in the post must beat their man down the court and then make contact early to keep them as far out as possible.

By doing so, there’s less chance that they’ll receive the basketball and have the opportunity to score from close range.

This isn’t specific to the initial sprint down the floor either.

Post defenders should be legally physical with their opponent the entire possession to keep them as far away from the rim as possible.

21. Make Contact and Secure the Rebound

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Too many players will play hard defense and force a contested shot, but once the shot has left the opponents hands, they act like their job is finished.

A defensive possession isn’t over until your team has rebounded and secured the basketball.

I hesitate to write the traditional ‘box out on every shot’ because I feel too many players get so focused on boxing out their opponent that they forget to rebound the basketball.

If you’re close to the basket, box out.

If you’re away from the basket, make contact with your opponent and then pursue the basketball.

Understand Your Team’s Defensive System

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22. What Defense is Your Team Running?

An obvious but important question.

A lot of times a youth basketball coach will install a defense by explaining how it works, but never directly telling the players what it is.

Make sure you find out what the coach is running so that you can go home and learn more about the defense you’re going to be playing.

Study it until you understand it completely. You never want to get lost when you’re playing defense.

Once you’ve gained deep knowledge of what to do on the defensive end of the floor, the coach will be able to trust you to make the right decisions and that will usually lead to an increase in court time.

23. How Does Your Team Defend the Pick and Roll?

The pick and roll is arguably the most effective action in basketball.

In order to be a great defender, you must know how your team’s defense is designed to defend it.

Depending on the age and skill level of your opponents, some coaches will choose to go under the screen, over the screen, or even switch the screen.

Some teams will have different defensive actions depending on where the basketball is on the court or even depending on which offensive players are involved in the screen.

Failure to defend the pick and roll correctly will almost always lead to an open shot from the offensive team.

If this is something you need to ask and clarify with your coach, do it.

24. What Are the Defensive Rotations?

“Defense is all about helping. No one can guard a good dribbler, you have to walk kids through how to help and then how to help the helper” – Bob Knight

Being able to rotate correctly and immediately on defense is by far the hardest part of defense for most players.

Players get stuck in the ‘this is my man and I have to stop them from scoring’ mentality and forget that basketball isn’t played individually. It’s played as a team.

There are going to be breakdowns in the defense from time to time and players must be ready and willing to rotate off their player and help out their teammates.

Therefore, having complete understanding of the defensive rotations is incredibly important for a great defender.

The most common rotations that are when there’s a baseline drive.

The help defender on split-line needs to rotate across to prevent the layup and then the high defender needs to rotate down to stop the pass to the helper’s defender.

25. How Are You Defending the Post?

Every single player on the team must understand the rules on defending players in the post.

This includes the guards on the team.

Whenever I help out coaches with tall and strong guards on their team, I always recommend they use them in the post. The opposition guards never know what to do because they’ve never been taught post defense!

Specifically, all players must understand how to front the post, 1/2 front from either side, and how to play behind.

How your team uses these tactics in games is up to the coach and the defensive system used by the team.

Ensure that all players know exactly what to do if they get stuck in a post defense situation.

Source: basketballforcoaches.com

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Nellakir helps young athletes reach their goals by providing the highest quality Sprung Timber Sports Floor playing surfaces.